COVID’s role in breaking the taboo of death

COVID has meant the topic of death has sadly been brought to the forefront of the news as well as our minds. Of course, we hope it won’t affect our own family and friends, but the reality of the situation is forcing people to have those challenging but important conversations.

Death is difficult to talk about, it is only natural that we would want to shy away from a complicated and emotional topic. However, it is important that we all start talking about it and have more open discussions about death. Learning to come to terms with death means that we can properly discuss our wants or fears. This allows us to cope better when we lose a loved one, especially during uncertain times like these.

 

How COVID has changed how we grieve

In order to mitigate the spread of the virus, the capacity at funerals has been limited. With restrictions now beginning to ease, a maximum of 30 guests may attend and there must be space at the venue to accommodate for adequate social distancing with local lockdowns facing even tighter restrictions.

As much as everyone understands the importance of these measures to protect the population, the reality of not being able to hold the ceremony your loved one may have wanted, is difficult to deal with. How can families choose which relatives can attend or more importantly, which relatives cannot?

Funeral ceremonies are also having to become simpler, with more people now opting for cheaper, less elaborate services. With limited numbers, some communities have been coming out and lining the streets to pay their respects to those they have lost.

It is not just the limited number of guests, but the distancing of those guests at the service means that we can no longer comfort each other with touch. A simple hand on the shoulder can be the comfort that someone needs during a difficult time.

 

Learning to communicate about death

We are all having to come to terms with death in a new way. We may not be able to physically comfort each other right now, but by video calls, we can reach out to loved ones and have those important conversations. Religious leaders are also now relying on digital forms of communication, like video calling, to reach out to communities and help support them online.

 

What measures are currently in place at funerals?

With guidelines changing constantly, along with local lockdowns too, finding out what you can and cannot do safely is challenging. You can find the most recent government advice about funerals during COVID-19, by taking a look at our blog, Funeral advice and information during the coronavirus outbreak. We will be updating this regularly so you can be sure to find the latest information.

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Call a member of the Funeral Choice advice team on 01983 754387

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Funeral Director fees

The price quoted contains the Funeral Director fees for a simple funeral. This includes:

  • Funeral Director fees for meetings, paperwork and running the funeral
  • Collection of the deceased and care prior to funeral
  • Hearse or appropriate vehicle for transport to the funeral
  • Basic coffin

The Funeral Director fees quoted do not include third party costs (often called disbursements). The Funeral Director will guide you through your options. These costs are:

  • Cremation or burial fees
  • Medical certificate for cremation
  • Clergy or officiant fee for conducting the ceremony

In addition to the disbursements you may want to discuss optional costs with your Funeral Director - these could include:

  • Funeral flowers
  • Memorial (venue hire, catering etc)
  • Memorial headstone
  • Orders of service
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What is a Direct Cremation?

A Direct Cremation is an alternative to the traditional funeral. This involves the cremation of the deceased without a funeral service. A Direct Cremation is generally the most economic option because costs of the coffin, preparation of the body, funeral service and expensive transportation are not included. However, many people choose Direct Cremations for reasons other than expense, for example:

  • - Wanting to have a memorial at a different time to the cremation
  • - Expressed desire from the deceased to not have a ceremony
  • - Individuals with relatives who face big physical or geographical challenges in coming together for a ceremony

The prices quoted for Direct Cremations include:

  • All charges, meetings and paperwork for the cremation
  • Collection of deceased and care prior to cremation
  • A simple coffin and urn for the ashes
  • Cremation fees and delivery of ashes to the family
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Why is this price Estimated?

We work hard to ensure the Funeral Director Fees we display are accurate and up to date. However, unlike with our partners, we cannot guarantee this price is correct today.

Funeral Director fees

The price quoted contains the Funeral Director fees for a simple funeral. This includes:

  • Funeral Director fees for meetings, paperwork and running the funeral
  • Collection of the deceased and care prior to funeral
  • Hearse or appropriate vehicle for transport to the funeral
  • Basic coffin

The Funeral Director fees quoted do not include third party costs (often called disbursements). The Funeral Director will guide you through your options. These costs are:

  • Cremation or burial fees
  • Medical certificate for cremation
  • Clergy or officiant fee for conducting the ceremony

In addition to the disbursements you may want to discuss optional costs with your Funeral Director - these could include:

  • Funeral flowers
  • Memorial (venue hire, catering etc)
  • Memorial headstone
  • Orders of service
Close
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Funeral Choice charity donation

To redeem the £20 charity donation all you have to do is select the charity from the dropdown list in the Make Contact form. Once you have confirmed arrangements with that funeral director send us an email to info@yourfuneralchoice.com confirming the service has been arranged. After we receive this email we will make the donation to the chosen charity and confirm back to you.

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